4th April 2014

The Fullness Of Bread 

“He prepared a meal for them, baking bread without yeast.”
Genesis 19:3 (NIV UK)
 

In this story about Lot, he has insisted on bringing the two angels into his house, probably because he knew how dangerous the city was at night. He offered them food but there was not enough time to prove the yeast before adding it to the flour to make fresh bread: so Lot made some unleavened bread in haste.  The implication is, that given sufficient time, Lot would have chosen to make leavened bread instead. 

It’s not often than we come across a poem about this small incident in Lot’s life, but there is one that was published in 2000. In her poem “Lot bakes for the angels” from her book …The One Loaf, an everyday celebration (Wild Goose Publications, Glasgow, UK) modern poet and bread enthusiast Joy Mead compares the flatness of unleavened bread to the fullness of Jesus. Mead writes: 

            “I wonder about this unleavened bread
            tasting of honey and purity
            And think how Jesus offers
            the Bread of Life:
            wholeness and fullness:
            rich and yeasty, alive and rising,
            love-filled” 

Biblically speaking, bread is central not only to the Middle Eastern diet but also to many narratives and spiritual analogies. It was the apostle John who noted that Jesus said, “I am the Bread of Life”, when “the Jewish Feast of Tabernacles was near” (John 6:48; 7:2). What kind of bread did he have in mind? Was it leavened or unleavened? Does it even matter which it was?  It’s not mentioned but we do have a clue – Jesus expanded his statement, “I am the living bread that came down from heaven” (John 6:51). The life of bread is in the yeast: it was the rich, filling, tasty bread that Mead writes about. The fullness is what is important in the reference to the Bread of Life. The fullness of Jesus’ living in us permeates every aspect of our lives, just as yeast permeates and gives fullness of flavour to bread. 

So next time you have some delicious, freshly baked, risen bread, why not think of the Bread of Life, “alive and rising” and “love-filled”? 

Prayer
Eternal Father, thank you that Jesus is the living Bread of Life, and that he sustains me and nourishes me every day.  In Jesus’ name.
Amen
 

Study by James Henderson

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ancientbibleAbout the Author:
James Henderson is the National Ministry Leader for Grace Communion International in the UK and Ireland.  This weekend James is speaking in our Leeds congregation.  You are welcome to attend any of our local congregations.  For details of your nearest local congregation, check on our website, www.wcg.org.uk under the ‘Churches’ tab, or ring +44 (0)1858 437099.

Contact:
Email:  admin@daybyday.org.uk

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