21st January 2011

The Unjust Judge

“There was in a certain city a judge who did not fear God nor regard man. Now there was a widow in that city; and she came to him, saying, ‘Get justice for me from my adversary.’ And he would not for a while; but afterward he said within himself, ‘Though I do not fear God nor regard man, yet because this widow troubles me I will avenge her, lest by her continual coming she weary me.’”
Luke 18:2-8 (NKJV)

Many who read this parable conclude that it says we need to pray over and over and beg for God to answer our prayers. Look closer though, and you might just find it teaches the opposite.

Is God really likening himself to an unjust judge who does not care? Read on in verses 7-8, “And shall God not avenge His own elect who cry out day and night to Him, though he bears long with them? I tell you that He will avenge them speedily.” God cares deeply about injustice and says he will avenge, as we also read in Romans 12:19, “Beloved, do not avenge yourselves, but rather give place to wrath; for it is written, ‘Vengeance is Mine, I will repay,’ says the Lord.”

It is the ‘speedily’ in verse 8 that may cause us problems, because this means to us, NOW, today, or at the latest, tomorrow! Which is why it goes on to say in verse 8, “Nevertheless, when the Son of Man comes, will He really find faith on the earth?” And why verse 1 says the parable was given so men would not give up and stop praying.

It seems that the parable was given in response to the disciples’ question in Luke 17:20, about when the Kingdom of God should come. God does not regard time in the same way as we do. Quickly, here, has more to do with certainty, than time. We can have total trust and faith in His justice.

Prayer
Father in Heaven, there is so much injustice in the world we live in. Thank you that we can rely totally on your perfect justice.
Amen

Study by Nancy Silcox

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Comments

2 Responses to “21st January 2011”

  1. John Rodgers on January 21st, 2011 9:29 pm

    Thanks Nancy for pointing out that the chapter break between Luke 17 and 18 should be ignored. I have read from 17:20 to 18 :8 ignoring the chapter break several times. It is like switching a light on in the dark. It is the same subject. When those difficulties spoken of in Luke 17 start to happen, then we should pray and not faint. If the unjust judge would avenge for the widow, how much more will our heavenly Father avenge the Christians who are wronged. It makes sense especially when read with Rev 6:10 . John & Elizabeth Rodgers

  2. John Rodgers on January 21st, 2011 9:29 pm

    Thanks Nancy for pointing out that the chapter break between Luke 17 and 18 should be ignored. I have read from 17:20 to 18 :8 ignoring the chapter break several times. It is like switching a light on in the dark. It is the same subject. When those difficulties spoken of in Luke 17 start to happen, then we should pray and not faint. If the unjust judge would avenge for the widow, how much more will our heavenly Father avenge the Christians who are wronged. It makes sense especially when read with Rev 6:10 . John & Elizabeth Rodgers

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