May 15th 2010

The Rule Of The Peace Of Christ

“Let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, since as members of one body you were called to peace.”

Colossians 3:15 (NIV)

How often it is that strife rises up between people because something is said that aggravates a situation.  Sadly many times this is deliberate, as someone tries to score points by criticising or tearing down the other.  This is the way of the world, where one is enlarged as another is belittled.

The Apostle Paul encourages a very different approach to human relationships.  He suggests that what we say or do should always seek to create peace.  That our intention should be to diffuse, and not to inflame, as the verse above incidates.

Paul uses an interesting word in the verse above.  The word ‘rule’ is a word taken from athletics and means to umpire.  Umpires have the last word in a dispute, like in a tennis match where a line call is disputed.  The umpire makes the final decision whether the ball was in or out.

Paul is saying that the ‘Peace of Christ’ should be the umpire; that decisions should always seek to provide peace.  It is this peace of Christ acting on our hearts that determines what response we have to the many and varied situations of life.

Paul encourages us to weigh all that we say or do against peace–a peaceful outcome.  He asks us to consider the impact of our words or actions, and to endeavour to be a channel of peace.  This may cause us to slow our reactions a little but this is no bad thing.  Hasty words are often the source of upsets and annoyances and once uttered are impossible to unsay, and any damage they have caused is difficult to undo.

Let’s take the apostle’s advice, and let the peace of Christ have the last say.

Prayer

Father in Heaven, thank you for the wonderful gift of speech.  Let me offer every word I say as an instrument of your peace and may they bring calm and harmony to those who hear them.

Amen

Study by David Stirk 

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