January 12th 2009

Odd Or Not?

“And He said to them, “Why did you seek Me? Did you not know that I must be about My Father’s business?”
Luke 2:49 (NKJV)

That seems to be about the first of Jesus’ words we have recorded for us in the New Testament. He was twelve years old. Think about the 12-year-olds you know. What are they interested in: Football, making noise, antagonising his sister if it’s a boy; pony riding and dance lessons, and perhaps reading Harry Potter.

Of course Jesus was special. Actually he was probably thought of as odd by his contemporaries. They didn’t know he was special; to them he was just very odd. After all, it’s not natural to be interested at that age in religion. Today I have no doubt that his teachers would have been writing reports to Social Security about him, expressing grave concern that he was not developing normally.

Well, we are adults. To an extent we are freer than young Jesus was; no one is going to bat an eyelid if we ‘do’ religion. Oh, some of what you do in the name of religion might raise eyebrows. And some of what you do in the name of religion might even embarrass you—but you can get away with it.

Only most of us don’t choose to, because, even as adults we’re still not interest in being about our Father’s business. Which is a pity, because Our Father’s business is us. He’s very interested in you and me. He has mapped out a fabulous future for each one of us. It’s all laid out.  It’s already been prepared, ratified, paid for, sealed, and ready to be delivered. All we have to do is recognise it, receive it, and then wait for it.

Only most of us are just not interested in being about our Father’s business. When you think about it, who is really the odd one, young Jesus or us?

Prayer
Most merciful Father, thank you for turning us right side up in calling us to you. Help us to recognise that you only have our best interests at heart. That very often we are our own worst enemies. Help us to be more about your business, and less about our own. In Jesus’ name we pray.
Amen

Study by John Stettaford

Print Friendly

Print This Article

Comments

Got something to say?